Training and Mentorship

The cornerstone of JAWS’ work is training and mentorship. Often this takes place at our annual Conference and Mentorship Program (CAMP) gathering, but we also strive to provide opportunities for members to connect through regional gatherings and trainings. In addition, we also work to partner up mentors who wish to share their experience and expertise with mentees who seek to grow, advance and lead. We call this symbiosis, as mentoring is often a two-way exchange.

CAMP 2017: Pay it forward with JAWS fellowships fundraising campaign

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By Nicole Raz, JAWS fellowships co-chair

Can you point to the exact moment when you realized, “Aha! Now I get to be in a position to pay it forward”?

I can. It was at the end of my JAWS Emerging Journalist Fellowship in 2014. The fellows and I organized on Twitter to take over the stage of whatever wonderful lunch or wrap-up session was taking place to say thank you to everybody for giving us the opportunity to be part of JAWS and 2014 JAWS’ Conference and Mentoring Project (CAMP).

CAMP 2017: Meet Maureen Bunyan, Fran Lewine speaker

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We’re very excited to announce that television news anchor Maureen Bunyan has agreed to be the Fran Lewine interviewee at CAMP this October!

Maureen Bunyan is a 44-year veteran of television news who anchored the 6 o’clock weeknight newscasts for ABC7/WJLA-TV from 1999 to 2017.

She is known as a leader in the newsroom and an advocate for women and minorities in journalism. She is a founder of the International Women’s Media Foundation which serves women in the media in 100 countries. She is also a founder of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), where she was inducted into the NABJ Hall of Fame in January of 201

CAMP 2017: Nikole Hannah-Jones, Lynn Sweet to keynote

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By Marina Villeneuve, CAMP co-chair

This year at the Conference and Mentoring Project (CAMP), we’re celebrating the act of veering off the beaten path and speaking truth to power.

And in that vein, we are so excited to announce our two keynote speakers: Nikole Hannah-Jones, a domestic correspondent for The New York Times Magazine focusing on racial injustice, and Lynn Sweet, a columnist and Washington Bureau Chief at the Chicago Sun-Times.

CAMP 2017: First set of conference programming, featuring reporter’s toolkit and career building

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By Lindsey Anderson, CAMP co-chair

Registration for CAMP 2017 is in full swing – and a slate of engaging and enlightening sessions is already lined up.

Sessions this year are organized around three themes:

Going Deep: Focused on specific reporting topics to build your expertise
Your Path: How to navigate career hurdles and find opportunities to advance
Reporter’s Toolkit: Concrete tips and tools to help you hone your trade

Here is a preview of some sessions.

CAMP 2017: Register for pre-conference workshops on podcasting and leadership

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By Roxanne Foster, JAWS operations director

You asked, we delivered: we have two exciting pre-conference workshops planned on podcasting and leadership skills.

In 2013, men hosted 70 percent of the 100 most popular podcasts in the world (Bitch Magazine) and the number of women leaders and employees has remained stubbornly flat since the nineties (ASNE).

All you trailblazers out there working to reverse those stats, these are for you.

CAMP 2017: Get ready for the online and on-site auctions

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Meg HeckmanBy Meg Heckman, JAWS Member

This year’s Conference and Mentoring Project (CAMP) is still months away, but it’s already time to start thinking about what you can donate to our online and onsite auctions.

This will be the fifth year JAWS has operated an online auction, giving members who are unable to attend CAMP a chance to bid on great stuff while supporting a good cause.

Last year, we raised over $3,000 through the online auction, and we’d love to beat that number this fall – so start thinking about what you can contribute. Luxury items and vacation destinations are always welcome, but services – editing, career coaching and book proposal coaching – are usually a hit, too.

CAMP 2017: Unplugging in Arkansas, conference registration opens April 24

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By Roxanne Foster, JAWS Operations Director

Who’s ready for CAMP 2017 in Hot Springs?

I already know what some of you are thinking because I read it on your faces whenever I mentioned being excited about heading to Arkansas, for CAMP 2017 while in Roanoke last year.

Arkansas?

Here’s the scoop: if you’ve never visited Arkansas, you don’t know what you’re missing. Just ask any of the JAWdesses whose faces lit up when I mentioned we’d be at The Arlington because they know all about this historic gem in the heart of the Ouachita Mountains where unplugging from the hustle of life helps melt the stress away. (Taking a dip in one of the thermal baths filled with 98 degree water brought up from the earth’s core, followed by a massage also helps.)

CAMP 2017: Propose a session by Jan. 17

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By Lindsey Anderson, JAWS CAMP 2017 co-chair

Somehow 2016 has flown by, and we’re already preparing for the 2017 JAWS CAMP in Hot Springs, Ark., next October.

We want next year’s CAMP to inspire you, encourage you and teach you something new — but we need your help.

Do you have an idea for an awesome keynote speaker? Do you want to set up a panel or workshop? Are you itching to share your know-how on a certain topic or technology?

We want to hear from you!

CAMP 2016: Being a Muslim reporter in the age of Islamaphobia

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10302016_jawscamp_dailyselects_ericayoon_15Story by Mary Pember, 2016 JAWS Fellow | Photo by Erica Yoon, CAMP photographer

Although the faces and names are new, a panel at JAWS CAMP about Islamaphobia reaffirmed a shamefully persistent problem in today’s newsrooms: Too few people of color and diverse religious backgrounds are at the table when journalists decide how to cover communities that fall outside of the knowledge and comfort zones of mainstream white America.

CAMP 2016: Covering mass shootings: Best practices for journalists

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10292016_jawscamp_dailyselects_ericayoon_9Story by Brenna Goth, 2016 JAWS Fellow | Photo by Erica Yoon, CAMP photographer

Journalists never know when they might be called to cover a mass shooting or other violent tragedy.

Reporters are not always prepared. National publications might send them to an unfamiliar place or local media could pull them off their normal beats. Unreliable official sources, misinformation spread through social media and competing narratives can complicate the chaos.

CAMP 2016: Connecting with sources in a suspicious society

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kotecha_art_of_storytelling_building_trust_2Story and photos by Jigna Kotecha, 2016 JAWS Fellow

How do journalists report stories of people who are distrustful of news media? How can a journalist establish trust to get invited into people’s lives? Fernanda Santos, Phoenix bureau chief of The New York Times, answered these questions at an Oct. 29 JAWS panel on the art of storytelling by sharing her experience reporting about a wildfire in Arizona that killed 19 firefighters in 2013.

CAMP 2016: When the workplace does you wrong, is there a way to make it right?

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farzan_workplace_marissa_evansStory and photo by Shahla Farzan, 2016 JAWS Fellow

Like many workers, journalists face a range of issues in the workplace, from harassment to discrimination. Feelings of powerlessness and isolation often prevent journalists from voicing concerns about issues, particularly for freelancers and other contractors. At a panel on workplace challenges at JAWS CAMP on Oct. 29, five panelists spoke about their personal experiences and suggested potential ways to navigate difficult situations.