Work We Do

Member blog post: Journalists lament anniversary of Post reporter’s captivity

Member Blog Post l

By Jane Meacham, JAWS member

On the year anniversary of Washington Post Correspondent Jason Rezaian’s detention in Iran’s toughest prison, a half-million people have been moved to sign a petition seeking his release.

Journalists including JAWS members on July 22 decried Rezaian’s lengthy captivity by Iran under vague, unsupported charges. A press conference at the National Press Club led by Rezaian’s brother and family spokesman, Ali; Post Executive Editor Martin Baron; and attorneys working on strategies for Jason Rezaian’s release provided little encouragement for resolution of the case, but the jailed reporter’s brother sought more worldwide support for the petition to be submitted to the United Nations Human Rights Council.

Member blog post: Contribute to a JAWS cookbook

Member Blog Post, Recent News l

Happy hours. Potlucks. Camp buffets. With food and drink, members of the Journalism and Women Symposium (JAWS) celebrate steps big and small.

That’s why we hope to commemorate 30 years of JAWS history with a modest cookbook – a collection of your stories and recipes. Consider it a keepsake, a smorgasbord of inspiration, maybe even a fundraising tool.

We’ll need your help. The key ingredient is a good tale to introduce a favorite recipe: maybe about some taste that’s indelibly linked to an assignment or a dish that you’ve brought to a JAWS gathering. No recipe? No problem. Tell a JAWS food story; we might even find a recipe to match.

Abandoned Baby

By (author): Melissa Ludtke

In this first of six stories from the series “Touching Home in China: in search of missing girlhoods,” two girl babies are abandoned in rural China. Taken to the same orphanage and adopted by American families, they return as teens to the towns where their lives began. Videos, photo galleries, interactive graphics and audio narrations tell their story in the context of China’s one-child policy and its ensuing gender imbalance.

This iBook includes intimate videos of the girls’ adoptions in China; a unique interactive timeline of population policies, “From Mao to Now”; a seesaw graphic illustrating China’s extreme gender imbalance; and artists’ interpretations of the consequences of the one-child policy – from “missing daughters” to lonely childhoods.