CAMP 2016: Sessions

JAWS CAMP 2016, Recent News l

20151009_CAMP_022v2Here is a preview of the sessions; more speakers and topics to be added.

Pro Tips for Media Jugglers: When to Put Down the Tech and Pick Up Your Notebook and Other Multimedia Lessons Learned

None of us can do it all and do it WELL, but journalists today have to understand the values of evolving tech tools, when to use them, and when to put them aside. In this lively panel conversation, we’ll cover the strengths and drawbacks of using audio, video, photography, social media posts and more in your daily reporting and story production. Hear from seasoned professionals who embrace innovation as well as journalists at the early stages of multimedia careers. We’ll talk about building a network of allies, mentors and experts as well as finding the training you need when you need it.

About the organizers: Panelists include Fara Warner, global editorial director of WSJ; Chris Graves, columnist/storyteller/digital strategist at Enquirer Media; and Ariel Min, multimedia journalist at Circa.

Lessons Learned From Covering the 2016 Campaign

This panel of veteran political and campaign reporters will discuss what journalists can take away from the historic 2016 elections from the presidential level on down. It’s been an unusual —  at best —  year for reporters on the campaign trail, and the panelists will discuss more than war stories. They’ll talk about what this election means for the news industry, for women and for Americans overall.

About the organizers: Moderated by Angela Greiling Keane, White House correspondent for Bloomberg. Panelists include Meg Heckman, lecturer of journalism, University of New Hampshire; Sandra Fish, independent journalist at Fishnette LLC; Mary C. Curtis, political columnist at Roll Call and NPR contributor; and Kathy Kiely, Washington journalist currently with BillMoyers.com.

Staying Alive: How to Navigate the Risks of Overseas (and Domestic) Reporting

Imagine being kidnapped in a foreign land in the midst of a civil war. Imagine your car breaking down in a remote forest infamous for rebel attacks. Imagine falling ill with malaria in a war zone without hospitals. Scary things happen when you’re reporting from abroad and even from the relative safety of the U.S. – just look at some of our recent political rallies. Tina Susman and Kim Gamel have been through most of these things and survived, using a few handy tips picked up along the way. With attacks on the media worsening each year, and with more women than ever going into reporting, they’re eager to share their experiences and advice with JAWS members.

About the organizers: Tina Susman, BuzzFeed News’ national editor, has been a foreign correspondent in Africa and the Middle East and a national correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, AP and Newsday. Kim Gamel, based in Seoul, South Korea for Stars and Stripes, has reported for AP from Europe, the Middle East, and Afghanistan.

Five Jawdesses in Five Minutes (each)

We’ll bring our programming to a conclusion with lightning talks by five JAWS members talking about what Journalism and Women Symposium means to them.

Leadership in the Newsroom: How to Move Up in Management
Want to be a leader in your newsroom? Join our discussion with an impressive lineup of women journalists who have climbed the corporate ladder. Learn on how to prepare for a promotion and how to generate the skills needed to be a standout leader in any newsroom.

About the organizers: Panelists for this session include Amy Resnick, editor at Pensions & Investments; Sheila Solomon, manager of recruiting and interns at Rivet News Radio; and Teresa Schmedding, managing editor of Rotary International and president of the American Copy Editors Society.

Muslim-American Journalists in an Age of ISIS and Islamophobia
After the terrorist attacks in Paris last year, the former mayor of Roanoke referenced the Japanese internment while calling for a ban on Syrian refugees. Though he later apologized for that statement, the political rhetoric of the 2016 election has continued to exacerbate Islamophobia. Attacks by people inspired by ISIS have brought additional scrutiny on the Muslim-American community.

Meanwhile, an increasing number of Muslim-American women are covering these issues as journalists. They are shaping new narratives, advocating for change and serving as de facto intermediaries between media and communities. In this panel, we’ll hear from three Muslim-American journalists who have taken different approaches on covering their religious community. While Islam has been particularly newsworthy lately, this conversation will be relevant to all journalists who have grappled with their professional and personal identities.

About the organizers: JAWS board member Megan Sweas has drawn together Dilshad Ali, managing editor of the Muslim Portal at Patheos.com; Asra Nomani, author and freelance journalist; and Waliya Lari, executive producer at WRAL-TV, to share their perspective on this important topic.

The Art of Storytelling: Covering Mass Shootings
It seems that in these times, all newsrooms must be prepared to cover high-profile shootings — whether they are in the workplace or at a nightclub, or of African-Americans whose deaths at the hands of police officers are captured via social media. This panel will address questions like: What must journalists keep in mind when such tragedies happen in their communities, or when they are sent in to cover such shootings? How can the “media” as a whole improve its coverage? What are best practices to using user-generated content and social media when such news breaks, and in the days following? What data sets are out there that could provide nuanced context as news develops?

About the organizers: Panelists for this session include Marina Trahan Martinez, Watchdog Desk administrator at the Dallas Morning News; Arelis Hernández, political reporter at the Washington Post; Tracie Powell, founder of All Digitocracy; and Mary C. Curtis, columnist at Roll Call and NPR contributor.

The Art of Storytelling: Building Trust
A deep-dive panel focused on the art of building trust with sources distrustful or unfamiliar with the media. This session will be a conversation with New York Times reporter Fernanda Santos, author of a recently released book detailing the devastating loss of 19 highly trained firefighters in the 2013 Yarnell Hill wildfire in Arizona.

Covering Solutions the Right Way

There has never been a more essential time for journalists to turn their attention to how individuals and institutions are responding to social problems. The news continues to highlight the best of the worst the worst offenders, the most intractable problems, the saddest and the most fear-based stories. These stories paint the picture of a world that is incapable of improving, and leads to detachment and audience disengagement. But there’s so much innovation happening that isn’t being reported because of the traditional journalistic misconception that reporting on solutions is somehow advocacy or PR.

Since 2013, the Solutions Journalism Network has trained more than 50 newsrooms and thousands of journalists in how to do a more complete and rigorous form of journalism. The session covers the fundamentals of solutions journalism, including what it is (and importantly, what it’s not), and how it can make your own journalism stronger, higher impact and more audience-friendly.

About the organizers: This session is brought to you by two staff members from the Solutions Journalism Network: Samantha McCann, Network Curator, and Liza Gross, Director of Practice Change.

When the Workplace Does You Wrong, Is There A Way To Make Things Right?

This panel will include discussion of everything from workplace harassment issues to bosses who don’t like feedback to what to do when your company says it is downsizing and plans to lay you off. Panelists will include JAWS members with firsthand experience dealing with the vagaries of the modern workplace, as well as an expert on workplace issues and discrimination based on age, race, gender and sexual preference. Panelists will discuss their own experiences and include practical advice on how to navigate workplace challenges, as well as when to stay and fight or cut your losses and move on.

About the organizer: Panel organizer is Miranda Spivack, a former editor and reporter at The Washington Post who is freelancing for The New York Times, the Center for Investigative Reporting and other news organizations. She is the Pulliam Distinguished Visiting Professor of Journalism at DePauw University. Panelists include Alina Tugend, a frequent writer for The New York Times, and other publications; Rosemary Armao, associate professor at SUNY-Albany and former executive director of Investigative Reporters and Editors; Marissa Evans, health policy reporter for CQ Researcher; Alice Ollstein, politics reporter at ThinkProgress; and Kim Bobo, veteran workplace organizer and executive director of the Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy.

Staying Alive: How to Navigate the Risks of Overseas (and Domestic) Reporting

Imagine being kidnapped in a foreign land in the midst of a civil war. Imagine your car breaking down in a remote forest infamous for rebel attacks. Imagine falling ill with malaria in a war zone without hospitals. Scary things happen when you’re reporting from abroad and even from the relative safety of the U.S. – just look at some of our recent political rallies. Tina Susman and Kim Gamel have been through most of these things and survived, using a few handy tips picked up along the way. With attacks on the media worsening each year, and with more women than ever going into reporting, they’re eager to share their experiences and advice with JAWS members.

About the organizers: Tina Susman, BuzzFeed News’ national editor, has been a foreign correspondent in Africa and the Middle East and a national correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, AP and Newsday. Kim Gamel, based in Seoul, South Korea for Stars and Stripes, has reported for AP from Europe, the Middle East, and Afghanistan.

Digital Education on a Shoestring: How to Launch Well-Rounded Multimedia Journalists From Small-Scale Academic Programs

In many small academic programs, instructors are required to teach a wide-ranging set of skills, often with minimal budgets for equipment and tech support. Some have come to the classroom with a professional background that emphasizes print or perhaps others have audio or video experience – but not all three. How do we ensure that journalism programs are stay cutting edge? How do staff maintain their skills as journalism educators? What are some ways to support students in developing skills for the professional arenas they will enter? Come to this moderated conversation with questions, challenges and examples of your biggest successes and failures. The group will brainstorm, share syllabi, share what worked – and what did not. Leave with some new strategies and tools to try in the classroom.

About the organizers: For this session, the ladies sharing their expertise will be Sarah Pollock, Professor of Journalism and Creative Nonfiction at Mills College; Jessica Langlois, journalism and creative writing instructor at Loyola Marymount University and California State University, Northridge; and Teresa Puente, formerly of Columbia College Chicago and incoming journalism professor at California State University, Long Beach.

Trust Us, We’re Journalists!

Why people don’t trust the media and what we can do about it.

It’s no secret that trust in the profession of journalism has been abysmally low for decades, according to surveys from Gallup, Pew and more. Research released in April by the American Press Institute (API) shows just 6 percent of people say they have a “great deal of confidence” in the press. Lack of trust can be devastating to the industry: The best journalism can’t have maximum impact if readers don’t trust it. In this session, we’ll summarize the results of the API report, review some intriguing takeaways from people interviewed for the report, and conclude with participants’ best ideas on how to improve trust in media.

Presenters for this session include API staff Jane Elizabeth, Senior Research Project Manager; Laurie Beth Harris, Editorial Coordinator; Meldon Jones, Research Associate; and Liz Worthington, Content Strategy Program Manager.